M.L. Miller here! Because you and I love the horror so much, I’ve decided to post a “Worth Noting” pick along with each of my Horror Countdown choices each day through October. The same rules apply. The film must have been released before September 30th, 2019 to the masses (no festival picks). This means that is available to view in theaters, On Demand, DVD/BluRay, or digital download. I’ve tried to indicate in the reviews how you can watch and enjoy these films.

How did I compile this list? Horror is such a broad and varied genre that sometimes, while these choices may not represent the best—something about the film is worth taking notice. Some of these films have similar themes to their counterparts in the main countdown. Some just missed the countdown by an inch or two. Others were just squozed in because there’s nothing like them out there. Others because they have been made available for the first time. One way or another, it’s more horror to enjoy!

I hope you’ll join me daily and don’t forget to like and share my picks with your pals across the web. Chime in after the review and let me know what you think of the film, how on the nose or mind-numbingly wrong I am, or most importantly, come up with your own darn list…let’s go!

Worth Noting – SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK!

I’m going to label this film as “just not for me.” I understand that the original stories and illustrations were effective for some. I also recognize that this is a slick looking and playing film. I also will go so far as saying that this film has some scary images and moments throughout. But I felt that this film uses the same scare too many times and that it was a little too bubble gum for my tastes. If you’re looking for a harmless film geared towards scaring kids, this is the one, but it just didn’t make my list for best of the best this year. Released on August 9, 2019, here’s my review for SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK! Still in theaters, Available soon on DVD/BluRay, digital download, and On Demand!

SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK (2019)

Directed by André Øvredal

Written by Dan Hageman, Kevin Hageman, Guillermo del Toro (screenplay), Marcus Dunstan, Patrick Melton (story), based on stories by Alvin Schwartz and illustrations by Stephen Gammell

Starring Zoe Margaret Colletti, Michael Garza, Gabriel Rush, Dean Norris, Gil Bellows, Lorraine Toussaint, Austin Zajur, Natalie Ganzhorn, Austin Abrams, Kathleen Pollard, Javier Botet, Hershel Blatt, Will Carr, Troy James, Brandon Knox, Jane Moffat, Amanda Smith, Matt Smith, Mark Steger, David Tompa, Marie Ward

Find out more about this film here

First off, I absolutely love that André Øvredal is getting some mainstream work. I think the man is talented and has given the horror genre a much-needed boost through only three films TROLLHUNTER, THE AUTOPSY OF JANE DOE, and now SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK. But after seeing SCARY STORIES, I have to point out that the man is in danger of repeating his schtick one too many times. While I am willing to give him a pass with his first big time movie credit, I’m hoping in his next film Øvredal comes up with a few new ways to bring the chills.

It’s Halloween night in the late 60’s in small town America and a group of outcasts find themselves in the abandoned house of Sarah Bellows, a young girl who coped with her tortured existence by writing her horrible experiences down as stories in a lost book. One of the kids, Stella (Zoe Margaret Colletti, a dead ringer for IT’s Sophia Lillis), finds the book and the group of kids become haunted by the creatures in those very stories…that are best told…in the dark.

The most powerful aspect of SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK is the fantastic imagery and monster effects the film is able to achieve. From the rickety and awkwardly walking scarecrow to the smiling overweight lunatic to the corpse missing a toe to the twisted jangly man; every monster in this story has been torn from the pages of the children’s book series illustrated by Stephen Gammell. This imagery is infamous for being nightmarish in its original form and I think Øvredal and producer Guillermo Del Toro has made a true achievement for bringing these images to vivid and terrifying life. The monsters alone make this film worth checking out for any horror fan who has been a fanatic from a very early age.

The film itself and the stories around these monsters is definitely geared for an all ages group. It’s the type of film a grownup horror fan can bring their kids to (I’d say 10 and up) and feel safe that there won’t be too many swears and no sex. It just celebrates that thrilling feeling that attracts true horror fans to the genre—it’s an element that is the gateway drug for deeper and darker horrors. In this way, the film feels more Speilbergian than Lovecraftian. There’s a scampy and real vibe to the kids and a very real, but not too intense feel to the dangers in SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK. This feels more like an all ages rollercoaster ride that can be experiences, jumped at, laughed at, and then soon shrugged off.

And I think that’s SCARY STORIES’s biggest fault as well. None of the scares really resonate beyond the immediate reaction. This isn’t a film you’re going to discuss long and hard after viewing. It’s a breezy popcorner that unfortunately is almost immediately forgettable after the credits roll. The dangers were so harmless (through there are dire consequences to some of the cast) that when the lights popped on in the theater and I walked to the car with my friends, not a lot of words were really spoken about the film at all. That’s not a good thing. This film felt safe. It was scary at times, but I never felt the need to look over my shoulder or cling to the armrest of my chair.

I think I know why I felt that way. After watching Øvredal’s take on scares from multiple monsters in multiple scenarios in SCARY STORIES, I feel the director is in danger of repeating himself. In THE AUTOPSY OF JANE DOE, some of the most terrifying moments came from a monstrous form shambling down a dark hall towards the protagonist in a painfully slow and suspenseful manner utilizing what isn’t seen and terrifying sounds to amplify the scares. This exact same scenario is repeated four times in SCARY STORIES. A scarecrow slowly shambles down a row in a cornfield towards one kid. A creepy smiling lunatic slowly walks toward a kid in a sanitarium. The corpse looking for her toe shuffles through a hallway of a suburban kid’s home. The jangly man contorts his shape as he approaches a kid in the long hallways of an old mansion. It’s the same setup/different monster. It worked most of the time, but by the end of the film, I was wondering if Øvredal had any other tricks in his bag. Here’s hoping that the next film under Øvredal’s watch comes up with a new gimmick to cause some shivers.

The gaggle of kid actors are not horribly annoying. Little ginger gal Zoe Margaret Colletti is the strongest of the bunch and Øvredal smartly gives her most of the screen time. The rest serve their purpose but don’t really stand out as much as Coletti did. The ending is pretty convoluted and hazy as the rules of this world are played with fast and loose. It leaves the door wide open for a sequel, but honestly, I’d rather see Øvredal do something new and original than return to this well. SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK is harmless horror. I’m sure those younger than I will and those who didn’t see THE AUTOPSY OF JANE DOE will find more to like. But for me, I felt that I had heard Øvredal’s stories one too many times in the same film for my liking. So, congrats for making the big time, Mr. Øvredal. SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK is a great highlight of your talents. I hope for better horrors from you in the future!


WORTH NOTING SO FAR…


SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK

THE PERFECTION

POOKA!

14 CAMERAS

CHILD’S PLAY 2019

YOU MIGHT BE THE KILLER

APOSTLE

THE RANGER

BLOOD PARADISE

THE WIND

DARLIN’

IT CHAPTER TWO

ERREMENTARI: THE BLACKSMITH & THE DEVIL

SAINT BERNARD

WRETCH

HOUSEWIFE

THE HOLE IN THE GROUND

THE CLEANING LADY

PET SEMATARY

BOOK OF MONSTERS

THE VELOCIPASTOR

WINTERSKIN

DRY BLOOD

BLUE MY MIND

THE LANDING

47 METERS DOWN: UNCAGED


M. L. Miller is a wordslinger/writer of wrongs/reviewer/interviewer/editor of MLMILLERWRITES.COM. Follow @Mark_L_Miller.

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