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GORE, QUEBEC (2014)

Directed by Jean Benoit Lauzon
Written by Jean Benoit Lauzon & Rick Mele (story), Rick Mele (screenplay)
Starring Myrthin Stagg, Blake Mawson, Andy Malone, Kate Elyse Forrest, Luke Madigan, Jean Benoit Lauzon, Kurt Ogilvie, Peri Greig, Rick Mele, Rachel Atherstone, Rufus Crawford, Kyle Fowler, Ryan Gibbs, Gillian Gibbs
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Some interesting decisions in terms of the way the story is presented at least keeps you on your toes in the Canadian slasher in the woods flick GORE, QUEBEC.


Stop me if you’ve heard this one before. I group of kids head out for a vacation at a cabin in the woods and are stalked by a silent and merciless killer. While the plot isn’t anything new, the way filmmaker Jean Benoit Lauzon and hiw co-writer Rick Mele tell the story at least tries to fill the story with flashbacks, sideways flashes and other storytelling methods to keep things interesting. The film starts out as a found footage film, with one of the campers addicted to “filming EVERYTHING” and happening to show up in places that advance a subplot of a bride to be who happened to have hooked up with another person in their group of friends and the object of desire for another in the group. That plot is interrupted when the gals in the group begin accusing the guys of peeping in their windows. When someone shows up stabbed and dying, that’s just the beginning of the carnage. But just when you’ve settled in and prepared for the found footage experience, it’s switches to cinematic mode and we are watching a regular movie, where we follow another section of the group of campers showing up late to the party. But as they arrive to an empty cabin and begin to realize something is wrong, we get a time wasting side story about a hiker in the snow and then an extended sequence of the killer building something in his workshed. Then it’s back to the present where the two final survivors run for their lives for the killer.

Already a short film at one hour eighteen minutes, at least ten of those minutes are wasted on the flashback to the snow, the woodshed construction sequence set to bad rock music, and endless scenes of the final two survivors running, and running, and running through the woods. On top of it all, with everything happening in the daytime and the killer in plain view, it’s hard to be afraid of the killer as he looks more like a clerk at a record store than an intimidating killer.

The film has some decent kills and there’s definitely an infectious affinity for the slasher genre at play here, but GORE, QUEBEC is in desperate need of some camera work that evokes more tension and mood and a solid edit of all of the unnecessary bits and pieces.

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